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Howler of the Month Archive

What we call "howlers" demonstrate the moral obtuseness, politicized outlook, and rank absurdity in the field of Middle East studies, and thus the need for Campus Watch. Selections change roughly every month.

Mark LeVine
"However fitfully, America recognizes its race problems. Israelis are still living in the American 1950s, while Gazans remain trapped in a ghetto in which no Ferguson resident would want to live."

Mark LeVine, professor of Middle Eastern history at the University of California, Irvine, drawing a parallel between the police shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri and Operation Protective Edge, Israel's military response to Hamas rocket fire; "Ferguson is Not Gaza . . . Yet," Al-Jazeera, August 18, 2014. (link to source)


Hamid Dabashi
"[T]hey will bomb Gaza back to the Stone Age they said, and that they did--and yet there are very few spots on planet earth today nobler to the human spirit of resistance to tyranny and injustice than Gaza--now held like a shining jewel on the loving ring of humanity around the globe--I kiss that noble ground and hold it dearer than cities full of ignoble postmodern architecture built on the stolen land of other people."

Hamid Dabashi, Hagop Kevorkian Professor of Iranian Studies and Comparative Literature at Columbia University, referring to Israel's Operation Protective Edge; Facebook, August 6, 2014. (link to source)


Nada Elia
"Ending Zionism is a feminist and a reproductive justice issue."

Nada Elia, global and gender studies professor at Seattle's Antioch University, in "Ending Zionism is a feminist issue"; The Electronic Intifada, July 24, 2014. (link to source)


Edward E. Curtis IV
"Because of its relevance and discursive power in so many domains, the study of Islam has become indispensable to the study of what it means to be human. The most enduring questions in the liberal arts inevitably involve Islam and Muslims these days. The very definition of freedom, goodness, beauty, and justice invoke Islam and Muslims in one way or another."

Edward E. Curtis IV, Millennium Chair of Liberal Arts and professor of religious studies at at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, in "Ode to Islamic Studies: Its Allure, Its Danger, Its Power"; Bulletin for the Study of Religion, May 2, 2014. (link to source)


Paola Bacchetta
"Muslims as enemy Others as queerphilia xenophobia. By that, I mean in which their queerphobia is displaced onto the enemy Others, who they now claim are the queerphobic ones. . . . Queers are now shifted to this position which under colonialism belonged to women: that is, queers are constructed as either silent self-hating collaborators with the presumed straight and queerphobic collective enemy Other camp, or imagined as enemy Other's victims requiring dominant saviors."

Paola Bacchetta, associate professor of gender and women's studies at the University of California, Berkeley, speaking at the Fifth Annual International Islamophobia Conference; UC Berkeley, April 17, 2014. (link to source)


Beshara Doumani
"Historians, what they really do is erase. That is their number one job."

Beshara Doumani, director of Middle East studies at Brown University, speaking at "The Settler Colonial Paradigm: Debating Gershon Shafir's 'Land, Labor and the Origins of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict' on its 25th Anniversary"; University of California, Los Angeles, April 10, 2014. (link to source)


Rabab Abdulhadi
"They're supporting Israel in order to destroy the world."

Rabab Abdulhadi, director of the Arab and Muslim Ethnicities and Diasporas Initiative at San Francisco State University (SFSU), describing Christian Zionists during the "Report and Discussion From Members of the North American Based Academic and Labor Delegation to Palestine 2014" at SFSU; ProIsraelBayBloggers, March 14, 2014. (link to source)


Hatem Bazian
"I voted for President Obama in two elections hoping that he would uphold the legacy of the real 'Jedi order' of civil and human rights advocates. But alas, it is a loss and a profound disappointment that he opted for the allure of the 'Dark Side.'"

Hatem Bazian, a senior lecturer in the department of Near Eastern studies and director of the Islamophobia Research & Documentation Project at the University of California, Berkeley, using a "Star Wars" analogy to describe President Barack Obama's adoption of "drone warfare" in the war on terror; Al-Jazeera, February 16, 2014. (link to source)


Joseph Massad
"[I]t seems to me that if one cannot criticise Israel's use of the holocaust without condemning anti-Semitism at the same time, lest the anti-Semites use one's criticisms to justify their rhetorical or physical attacks on Jews, it stands to reason that given the history of the use of the holocaust to justify Israeli and Zionist crimes, one should not be able to speak about the holocaust without condemning Israeli and Zionist crimes either, lest one's invocation of the holocaust be used by Zionists to justify their on-going crimes against the Palestinians."

Joseph Massad, associate professor of modern Arab politics and intellectual history at Columbia University, in "Jewish suffering, Palestinian suffering," Al-Jazeera, December 3, 2013. (link to source)


Ian Lustick
"The stage will be set for ruthless oppression, mass mobilization, riots, brutality, terror, Jewish and Arab emigration, and rising tides of international condemnation of Israel."

Ian Lustick, Bess W. Heyman Chair in Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania, describing what he sees as "likely scenarios" that will impel the implementation of his proposal to abandon the two-state solution to the Arab-Israeli conflict; "Two-State Illusion," New York Times, September 14, 2013. (link to source)


Hatem Bazian
"The utilization of Islamophobic and 'war on terror' tropes in Egypt are reflective of the global post-colonial epistemological trend that problematise Islam, as a religion, and Muslims, when seeking political agency grounded in a living tradition in the 'modern' nation-state."

Hatem Bazian, a senior lecturer in the department of Near Eastern studies and director of the Islamophobia Research & Documentation Project at the University of California, Berkeley, on the Egyptian military's "Islamophobia" towards the Muslim Brotherhood; "Egypt, the 'War on Terrorism' and Islamophobia," Al-Jazeera, August 20, 2013. (link to source)


Noah Feldman
"Rachid Ghannouchi, the spiritual leader of the Tunisian Islamists, has emerged as the closest thing to an Islamic Nelson Mandela."

Noah Feldman, Bemis Professor of Law at Harvard University, comparing Rashid Ghannouchi, the leader of Tunisia's ruling Islamist party Ennahda, to South African anti-apartheid activist and politician Nelson Mandela; "Don't Blame Islam for the Failure of Egypt's Democracy," Bloomberg News, July 5, 2013. (link to source)


Hatem Bazian
"Lack of evidence does not mean the lack of existence of Islamophobia."

Hatem Bazian, a senior lecturer in the department of Near Eastern studies and director of the Islamophobia Research & Documentation Project at the University of California, Berkeley, referring to FBI statistics showing that hate crimes against Muslims have remained relatively low and have trended downward since 2001; "Bias Against Muslims Rampant in 'Liberal' California," Electronic Intifada, June 25, 2013. (link to source)


Omid Safi
"President Obama visited the historic gate at Berlin Wall to make a series of comments on the 50 [sic] anniversary of JFK's famed 'Ich bin ein Berliner' speech. . . . As you stood on the Eastern side of the Berlin Wall, we too invite you to stand on the other side of another wall, the segregation wall in Palestine/Israel. Mr. President, tear down that wall."

Omid Safi, professor of Islamic studies at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, mistaking the Brandenburg Gate, at which President Obama spoke on June 19, for the Berlin Wall; "Beyond the Berlin Wall: 'Mr. Obama: Tear Down All These Walls," at the web log, "What Would Muhammad Do?," June 20, 2013. (link to source)


Omid Safi
"How we as a nation move forward is critical. . . . Do we turn into an angry mob accusing all Muslims of a crime that two men committed? Do we turn this into an anti-Muslim, anti-immigrant hysteria? . . . Do we want to be heroes, like the ones that put their own lives on the line. . . . Or do we give in to unjustified bloodlust?"

Omid Safi, professor of Islamic studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, in "10 Essential Points About the Boston Marathon Bombers, Islam, and America," Religion News Service, April 20, 2013. (link to source)


Juan Cole
"What happened in Boston is undeniably important and newsworthy. But so is what happened in Iraq and Syria. It is not the American people's fault that they have a capitalist news model, where news is often carried on television to sell advertising."

Juan Cole, Richard P. Mitchell Collegiate Professor of History at the University of Michigan, criticizing the U.S. media for devoting more coverage to the Boston bombings than to same day bombings in Iraq and government air strikes in Syria; Informed Comment, April 16, 2013. (link to source)


Joseph Massad
"The imperial complicity of the Gay International, including its Arab members, lies in their calling upon all Arabs who refuse the imperial hegemony of the hetero-homo binary to unlearn and unthink the way they desire, and that they learn and think their desires along the lines of the hetero-homo binary, indeed that the way they exist and the way they are, their very ontology, is a form of false consciousness, which they must shed, as the truth of who they are, according to this logic, lies in their adoption of the imperial hetero-homo binary through which they must apprehend themselves and their desires, which will lead, according to the Gay International, to their emancipation."

Joseph Massad, associate professor of modern Arab politics and intellectual history at Columbia University, in an interview titled "The Empire of Sexuality" conducted by Félix Boggio Éwanjé-Épée and Stella Magliani-Belkacem; Jadaliyya, March 5, 2013. (link to source)


Hatem Bazian
"If you get a B.A., you get a cubicle for your job when you graduate. If you get a Master's, you get a cubicle with a window. And if you get a PhD, you get a cubicle with a window and a bathroom."

Hatem Bazian, senior lecturer in the department of Near Eastern studies at the University of California, Berkeley, lamenting the fact that college graduates end up seeking out a profession rather than becoming activists; "SHHHH! Don't Talk About Palestine: Chuck Hagel, Judith Butler, and the Israel Lobby's Threat to Free Speech on Our Campus," UC Berkeley, February 26, 2013. (link to source)


Flynt and Hillary Mann Leverett
"I remember the very first time we met Khaled Mashal, the head of Hamas. And he said to us that he and his colleagues pray everyday that they can see facts as they are. And I always thought that is the ultimate realists' prayer: God give me the strength to see facts as they are."

Flynt Leverett, director of the Iran Project at the New America Foundation and professor of international affairs at Penn State University, speaking at an event for him and his wife (Hillary Mann Leverett, CEO of Strategic Energy and Global Analysis and Senior Lecturer at Yale University's Jackson Institute for Global Affairs)'s new book, "Going to Tehran," at the Center for the National Interest on February 21, 2013. (link to source)


Stephen Zunes
"Taliban were brutal, in their order, in their rule, but at least they brought stability and order."

Stephen Zunes, professor of politics and international studies and director of the Middle East studies program at the University of San Francisco, condemning U.S. involvement in Afghanistan in an interview with the Iranian regime-run PressTV; December 13, 2012. (link to source)


As'ad AbuKhalil
"I have often fantasized about my feelings as I board the plane to Palestine after the demise of Israel. How I would relish looking at all Israeli terrorist leaders behind bars. Hell, I would volunteer to serve as judge, jury, and guardsman."

As'ad AbuKhalil, a professor of political science at California State University, Stanislaus, in a web log entry titled, "Fantasy"; Angry Arab Blog, November 1, 2012. (link to source)


Joseph Massad
"Just as Israeli racist representations of Arabs are a reflection of an overall Israeli Jewish structural racism that pervades every aspect of Israeli Jewish society, American media racism is also just a branch of a larger American racism and racialism on which much of American culture, history, and national identity is based."

Joseph Massad, associate professor of modern Arab politics and intellectual history at Columbia University, in 'Homeland,' Obama's Show; MWC News, October 25, 2012. (link to source)


Ghassan El-Eid
"[Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad] is a pretty rational leader. He is not this crazed individual that the Western media tries to portray. He does have controversial views, and certainly gives justifications for that, but he was careful to support his arguments with facts."

Ghassan El-Eid, a professor of political science at Central Connecticut State University who brought twelve of his students to New York to dine with Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad during the United Nations General Assembly in September, 2012; The Central Recorder, October 24, 2012. (link to source)


As'ad AbuKhalil
"U.S. officials have been really insulting my intelligence all week with talk of the 'freedom of speech' that we have here in the U.S. that Muslims don't understand. . . . They understand that the U.S. government has made it illegal for anyone to express support for Hamas and Hizbullah in the U.S. Muslim[s] do understand that the U.S. has banned TV channels from the U.S. because they deemed them offensive to Israel. . . . We remember that the Bush administration asked all U.S. news media after Sept. 11 to refrain from airing any Bin Laden tapes."

As'ad AbuKhalil, a professor of political science at California State University, Stanislaus, citing the banning of terrorist propaganda outlets such as Hezbollah's Al-Manar and Hamas's Al-Aqsa TV as examples of free speech being impeded in the U.S.; Angry Arab Blog, September 17, 2012. (link to source)


Omid Safi
"Freedom of speech falls alongside other freedoms to live and be free from bombs falling on people's heads and to be free from occupations. . . . I will take free speech comments seriously when others take people's freedom of life and dignity and to be free from occupation just as seriously."

Omid Safi, professor of Islamic studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, in "Reaction to Anti-Islam Film Fuels Debate on Free Speech Versus Hate Speech," CNN's Belief Blog, September 12, 2012. (link to source)


Joseph Massad
"Washington has . . . been unable to restore stability, which, in US terms, is defined as dictatorial regimes that are staffed by obedient servants to American diktat and its junior partner in the region, the Jewish settler-colony."

Joseph Massad, associate professor of modern Arab politics and intellectual history at Columbia University, on instability in the Middle East in the wake of the "Arab spring"; Al-Jazeera, July 17, 2012. (link to source)


Juan Cole
"The Muslim Brotherhood is being positioned by the American Right as the new bogie man, in their quest to make America and the world Muslim rein."

Juan Cole, Richard P. Mitchell Collegiate Professor of History at the University of Michigan, in a web log entry titled, "Fox Smears Mursi with 'Jerusalem Capital' Lie (Murphy)"; June 25, 2012. (link to source)


Hamid Dabashi
"Today, Egyptians are the light of our world: instead of discouraging them, finding fault with them, the world must stand up in reverence and awe, salute them and happily sing with them in humility: 'Tahya Masr wa Tahya al-Huriyya, Thwarah Thwarah hatta al-Nasr, fi umma al-Dunya Diya / Long Live Egypt, and Long Live Freedom, Revolution, Revolution until Victory, in Egypt, the Mother of the World!'"

Hamid Dabashi, Hagop Kevorkian Professor of Iranian Studies and Comparative Literature at Columbia University, in "The Mother of the World: The Birth of Egypt's Democracy"; Al-Jazeera, June 13, 2012. (link to source)


Munir Jiwa
"What if Afghan women were coming to the West to save American women? What if Afghan women in burkas hearts' bled for women in this part of the world?"

Munir Jiwa, founding director of the Center for Islamic Studies at the University of California, Berkeley, and assistant professor of Islamic studies at the Graduate Theological Union, discussing his opposition to Western intervention in the Muslim world in the interest of protecting women's rights; UC Berkeley "Critical Discourses on Islamophobia: Symbols, Images, & Representations" conference, April 20, 2012. (link to source)


Juan Cole
"The flaw in the west's case [for Iran to abandon its nuclear program] is that it is hypocritical as long as the Israelis have some 400 nuclear warheads. Asking Iran to surrender even a virtual nuclear capacity when its rival has a real one makes for difficult strategic calculations. . . . Iran doesn't even have the nukes to give up, and probably cannot have them for a good ten years even if they decided they wanted them, which Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei emphatically says they do not."

Juan Cole, professor of history at the University of Michigan, in "China Hopeful Iran Will Compromise with the UNSC"; Informed Comment, April 14, 2012. (link to source)


Saree Makdisi
"Campus Watch still exists?! Someone just told me they are still peddling poison about events at UCLA."

Saree Makdisi, professor of English at the University of California, Los Angeles, and nephew of Edward Said, writing on his Twitter account, March 4, 2012. (link to source)


Omid Safi
"Let us pause and recall that it is the United States that is the largest producer of nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons on the face of the planet. And recall that the United States is the only country — so far, and God-willing, ever — to have dropped not one but two nuclear weapons on another population. And that our "democratic ally in the region" Israel, which is doing more warmongering than anyone else to drive this mad slide towards a war on Iran, is already in possession of over 200 nuclear warheads."

Omid Safi, professor of Islamic studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, in "Is Iran Really a Threat?"; God's Politics, a blog of the online journal Sojourners, February 7, 2012. (link to source)


John Esposito
"I'm uncomfortable with Ahmadinejad's rhetoric. But the person I'm more concerned about is Netanyahu, because his track record is that he not only says but he does."

John Esposito, director of the Prince Alwaleed bin Talal Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding at Georgetown University, equating Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad with Israeli prime minister Binyamin Netanyahu; The Irish Times, January 28, 2012. (link to source)


As'ad AbuKhalil
"[About] those firecrackers from Hamas [fired] at a town in occupied Palestine: You will notice there were like ten injured and sometimes they had shocks . . . they actually list the injured; they [listed] those whose feelings were hurt; those who were startled. This war crimes thing is for victimhood reputation."

As'ad AbuKhalil, a professor of political science at California State University, Stanislaus, and a research fellow at the Center for Middle Eastern Studies at the University of California, Berkeley, discussing rockets fired from Hamas-ruled Gaza into southern Israel at a "teach-in" at the University of California, Berkeley, on November 12, 2011. (link to source)


Hatem Bazian
"Religion is not just about praying . . . it's about manifesting justice. . . . If Moses, Muhammed, and Jesus come today, would they be a CEO or would they be here in tents with the people protesting?"

Hatem Bazian, senior lecturer in the department of Near Eastern studies at the University of California, Berkeley, delivering a "Solidarity Jummah Prayer" at the Occupy Oakland encampment; Bay Area Muslim Community Organizing Network, YouTube.com, October 28, 2011. (link to source)


Gilbert Achcar
"Holocaust denial is a form of protest."

Gilbert Achcar, professor of development studies and international relations at the University of London's School of Oriental and African Studies and author of "The Arabs and the Holocaust: The Arab-Israeli War of Narratives," speaking October 20, 2011, at the University of California, Berkeley. (link to source)


Rhoda Ann Kanaaneh
"Palestinians are routinely asked for their IDs . . . in Jewish areas and businesses. . . . This gate-keeping—a kind of invisible, internal Apartheid wall — is considered necessary because of the Palestinians' cultural characteristic of hating Jews."

Rhoda Ann Kanaaneh, a visiting scholar in the Department of Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies at New York University, inadvertently alluding to Palestinian anti-Semitism as the root cause of Israel's security measures at the first annual Students for Justice in Palestine national conference in October 2011; New Voices Magazine, October 15, 2011. (link to source)


Rashid Khalidi
"We have a very skewed definition of what's terrorist. We had a war between--war in which Israel waged on Gaza in 2008, 2009. There were 1,400 people killed in Gaza. There were 13 Israelis killed, and we castigate Hamas as a terrorist organization. I think...that's an American political determination of what is terrorist, unfortunately."

Rashid Khalidi, Edward Said Professor of Modern Arab Studies at Columbia University, responding to the statement, "Hamas is considered a terrorist organization by the State Department," made by host Neil Conan on the National Public Radio show, "Talk of the Nation"; transcript, September 19, 2011. (link to source)


Rashid Khalidi
"Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's repeated insistence that Palestinians recognize Israel as the Jewish state is entirely at odds with the principles of the modern-day United States and a throwback to an era in which the U.S. was considered a white state."

Rashid Khalidi, Edward Said Professor of Modern Arab Studies at Columbia University, upset that Illinois Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. visited Israel and urged Palestinian leaders to recognize it "as the homeland of the Jewish people"; Chicago Tribune, August 31, 2011. (link to source)


Juan Cole
"It seems to me clear that the Bush White House was upset by my blogging of the Iraq War, in which I was using Arabic and other primary sources, and which contradicted the propaganda efforts of the administration attempting to make the enterprise look like a wild shining success."

Juan Cole, Richard P. Mitchell Collegiate Professor of History at the University of Michigan, in a web log entry titled, "Ret'd. CIA Official Alleges Bush White House Used Agency to 'Get' Cole"; June 16, 2011. (link to source)


Joseph Massad
"In his speech to Congress, Prime Minister Netanyahu correctly diagnosed the situation on the ground. He declared: 'Our conflict has never been about the establishment of a Palestinian state. It has always been about the existence of the Jewish state.' It is the establishment of a Jewish settler colony that the Palestinians must accept to ensure a future for Jewish children and terminate a future for Palestinian children. Indeed it is precisely the refusal of Arabs to adopt Arabopedophobia that is the biggest impediment to peace in the region."

Joseph Massad, associate professor of modern Arab politics and intellectual history at Columbia University, in his essay, "Are Palestinian Children Less Worthy?"; Al Jazeera, May 30, 2011. (link to source)


Abdullah Antepli
"Being a Muslim in the United States is another form of torture, a psychological torture, an emotional torture, and it's just getting worse."

Abdullah Antepli, Duke University's first Muslim chaplain, speaking March 26, 2011, at the Duke Divinity School conference "Toward a Moral Consensus against Torture." (link to source)


Heidi Morrison
"I had an unexpected surprise when I showed up in Madison, Wisconsin, last week. As a Wisconsin resident, I had gone to join statewide demonstrations against the newly elected Republican governor Scott Walker's bill proposing to outlaw collective bargaining for most public employees. There, in the capital, I found the seeds of a revolution against Orientalism."

Heidi Morrison, assistant professor of modern Middle East history at the University of Wisconsin, La Crosse, comparing the public union protests in Wisconsin to the protests against Hosni Mubarak in Egypt; "Down With Hosni Walker," Middle East Online, February 28, 2011. (link to source)


Tariq Ramadan
"The Muslim Brothers began in the 1930s as a legalist, anti-colonialist and nonviolent movement that claimed legitimacy for armed resistance in Palestine against Zionist expansionism during the period before World War II. The writings from between 1930 and 1945 of Hassan al-Banna, founder of the Brotherhood, show that he opposed colonialism and strongly criticized the fascist governments in Germany and Italy. . . . Al-Banna's objective was to found an 'Islamic state' based on gradual reform, beginning with popular education and broad-based social programs."

Tariq Ramadan, Swiss Islam scholar and grandson of Muslim Brotherhood founder Hassan al-Banna, whitewashing the Islamist group's origins and goals; the New York Times, February 8, 2011. (link to source)


Joseph Massad
"Given the history of Mossad bombings of Egyptian post offices, cinemas, cultural centers, and train stations in the 1950s, and Mossad bombing operations across the Arab world that have never ceased to the present (the Mossad has always had a flair for car bombings), it would be important to investigate possible or even potential links between the Mossad operatives and the church bombers."

Joseph Massad, associate professor of modern Arab politics and intellectual history at Columbia University, suggesting that the Mossad was behind the December 31, 2010 bombing of a Coptic Church in Alexandria, Egypt, that killed 21 people; in Al-Ahram, January 7, 2011. (link to source)


Tamim Al-Barghouthi
"The alternative to the peace process is resistance in all its forms, including violence. I believe that if the Americans and Israelis maintain their conduct, it will lead us to confrontation. The only thing that prevents this confrontation now is the exaggerated leniency of the Palestinian leadership, which exposes its people to danger."

Tamim Al-Barghouthi, visiting assistant professor of politics at Georgetown University's Center for Contemporary Arab Studies, speaking on Al-Jazeera TV December 14, 2010. (link to source)


Mark LeVine
"If there's anyone who deserves the next Nobel Peace Prize more than the courageous American soldier, Bradley Manning, who is alleged to have given the documents to Wikileaks in the first place, I'd like to know."

Mark LeVine, professor of history at the University of California, Irvine, and senior visiting researcher at the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Lund University, Sweden, in his op-ed, "Wikileaks: Call of Duty"; Aljazeera, December 9, 2010. (link to source)


Zachary Lockman
"There's no document that says Ben Gurion said 'Expel all the Palestinians,' but I'm not sure you need one. There's also no paper from Hitler saying 'kill all the Jews' ... The point is, you don't always need documentary evidence to draw conclusions."

Zachary Lockman, professor of Middle Eastern and Islamic studies at New York University, during a discussion at NYU's Carter Journalism Institute, November 3, 2010. (link to source)


Kaukab Siddique
"This is actually a concerted act by the extreme right wing aligned with Israel to destroy someone who spoke out against them . . . I see this as a tremendous dumbing down of the discourse."

Kaukab Siddique, associate professor of English and journalism at Lincoln University of Pennsylvania, responding to the outcry over his call for the destruction of Israel at a September 3, 2010, rally in Washington as well as his history of Holocaust denial; Inside Higher Education, October 26, 2010. (link to source)


Flynt Leverett and Hillary Mann Leverett
"[F]or a 'Middle East peace process' to have any chance of working, the Islamic Republic of Iran needs to be at least an indirect party. Of course, Iranian officials have said over a number of years that...the Islamic Republic is not prepared to recognize a Zionist state."

Flynt Leverett, director of the Iran Project at the New America Foundation and professor of international affairs at Penn State University, and Hillary Mann Leverett, CEO of Strategic Energy and Global Analysis and Senior Lecturer at Yale University's Jackson Institute for Global Affairs, writing on "The Obama Administration, Iran, and Middle East Peacemaking," at their web site, The Race for Iran; September 6, 2010. (link to source)


Juan Cole
"It wasn't the 21-year-old Michael Enright who drunkenly slashed his New York city cab driver after asking 'Are you Muslim?' It was the Republican National Committee. . . . Newt Gingrich and Rick Lazio may as well have kept Enwright in their basements in chains and whipped him into a frenzy as to spew their hatred on the airwaves."

Juan Cole, professor of history at the University of Michigan, in a web log entry titled, "Republican National Committee Slashes New York Muslim Cabbie," August 25, 2010. (link to source)


Mark LeVine
"Most of the scholars I know who have spent their adult lives studying, living and working in the Arab/Muslim world have no desire to 'contribute to America's defence' in an unending global war; precisely because...they understand how false the premises of that war are, and how dangerous and unreliable are its goals."

Mark LeVine, professor of history at the University of California, Irvine, in "Understanding the Muslim World," Aljazeera.net, August 3, 2010. (link to source)


Jennifer Loewenstein
"We will never see a viable Palestinian state created and the United States and Israel will work arm-in-arm and hand-in-hand together in furthering US hegemony in the Middle East and beyond in central Asia and their policies all coincide with what Israel's long-term policy goals are which is regional domination."

Jennifer Loewenstein, associate director of the Middle East studies program at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, in an interview with Iran's Press TV, Tuesday, July 13, 2010. (link to source)


Muqtedar Khan
"When Muslims object to mockery of Islamic symbols, we scream freedom of speech. We call it an important institution of our culture and of democracy itself. But when Helen Thomas expresses her opinion, we destroy her career and her legacy."

Muqtedar Khan, associate professor of political science and director of the Islamic Studies Program at the University of Delaware, in his op-ed, "Pandemic of Hypocrisy Dominating Muslim Faith and American Life," Wilmington (Del.) News-Journal, June 29, 2010. (link to source)


Mark LeVine
"It is tragically fitting that this disaster should happen on Memorial Day in the US. The martyrs of the ships are heroes, they are warriors every bit as deserving of our tears and support as the soldiers of American wars past and present."

Mark LeVine, UC Irvine history professor, describing the members of the Turkish terrorist-supporting group IHH (Islan Haklary Ve Hurriyetleri Vakfi), who were killed by Israeli soldiers in self-defense aboard a Gaza Strip-bound flotilla; Al-Jazeera, June 1, 2010. (link to source)


Ali al-Amin Mazrui
"The population of Jews in the US is three percent ... but [their 'genius'] leads to their controlling so much power that even presidents are scared [of them]. Whether [President Barack] Obama will be able to escape the notion that three percent of the country is so powerful that the top gentile in the land cannot criticize Israel is not clear."

Ali al-Amin Mazrui, director of the Institute of Global Cultural Studies and Albert Schweitzer Professor in the Humanities at SUNY Binghamton, speaking at the Ifriqiyya Colloquium Conference at Columbia University on May 6, 2010. (link to source)


Jennifer Loewenstein
"All the assaults in 2006 from Israel into Lebanon were described as Israeli acts of self-defense. That is absurd. If the Israelis have the right to do that to another nation...then certainly Hezbollah has the right to receive arms from anybody it wants if Israel is going to attack it. ...[T]he real offenders here are the United States and Israel not Hezbollah, not Iran and not Syria."

Jennifer Loewenstein, associate director of the Middle East studies program at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, in an interview with Iran's English language network, Press TV, May 22, 2010. (link to source)


Muqtedar Khan
"If the threat of terrorism can be used to curtail civil liberties, why cannot it also justify putting limits on the right to mock Muhammad? Will we rather fight multiple wars, and even eliminate habeas corpus from our judicial philosophy (which is like war on ones own citizens), but not abstain from mocking Islam?"

Muqtedar Khan, associate professor of political science and international relations and director of Islamic studies at the University of Delaware, attacking the Western concept of free speech in a post titled "The Verbal Assault on Islam," at the On Faith blog of the Washington Post, May 4, 2010. (link to source)


Susan Slyomovics
"If Jews can get reparations from Germany, then Palestinians should get reparations from Israel. After all, what the Germans supposedly did to the Jews is what Israel is doing to the people of Palestine."

Susan Slyomovics, professor of anthropology and director of the Center for Near Eastern Studies (CNES) at UCLA, speaking to colleagues during a break at a conference at UCLA on April 16, 2010. (link to source)


Juan Cole
"Fox News and Rupert Murdoch bear some responsibility for such groups. When Glenn Beck tosses around a charge like 'anti-Christ' at a prominent liberal, he knows that term is an incitement for militant Christians. And the years of rabid Fox promotion of hatred of US Muslims is bound to get someone among them killed-- and is therefore murder by television."

Juan Cole, professor of history at the University of Michigan, writing about the Hutaree militia members who were arrested in Michigan, Ohio, and Indiana last month on charges that included seditious conspiracy and attempted use of weapons of mass destruction; in Salon, March 29, 2010. (link to source)


Ian Lustick
"People in distress blame the government, and now blaming the government means taking the side of these Muslim terrorists. They're about as jihadist as you and me, but they're a lot less happy."

Ian Lustick, Bess W. Heyman Chair in Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania, speculating on the motivation of Colleen LaRose, aka "Jihad Jane," a convert to Islam indicted for plotting with terror suspects abroad to kill Swedish cartoonist Lars Vilks for a caricature of Muhammad he drew in 2007; as quoted by the Associated Press, March 18, 2010. (link to source)


Ebrahim Moosa
"Wahabism is like the Baptists; it's kind of a denomination of sorts that started out in Saudi Arabia."

Ebrahim Moosa, associate professor of Islamic studies at Duke University, commenting on Wahhabi influence in higher education via the funding of Middle East studies at Georgetown and Harvard universities by Saudi Prince Alwaleed bin Talal; as quoted in the Charlotte Observer, February 25, 2010. (link to source)


Rashid Khalidi
"What I've said is that I think for a variety of reasons — strategic, moral, historical — that they should adopt a policy of non-violence, not just not killing civilians. I think that violence doesn't serve them, partly because they're dealing with a people which sees itself as the ultimate victims, and anything they do involving violence reinforces and strengthens that sense of victimhood."

Rashid Khalidi, Edward Said Professor of Modern Arab Studies at Columbia University, on what Palestinians should do to advance their cause, The Brown Daily Herald, February 19, 2010. (link to source)


John Esposito
"I always seem to speak in huge ballrooms that are filled. I wonder if it could be me?"

John Esposito, director of the Prince Alwaleed bin Talal Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding at Georgetown University, speaking about "The Future of Islam," of which he is co-author, at the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs, New York City, January 27, 2010. (link to source)


Andrew March
"The most common objection to polygamy is on grounds of gender equality, more specifically, female equality....Properly understood, polygamy involves no inherent statement about the essential inferiority of women, and certainly not more than many other existing practices and institutions (including many expressions of the main monotheistic religions) which political liberals regard as tolerable, even reasonable."

Andrew March, assistant professor of political science at Yale, in the abstract of "Is There a Right to Polygamy? Marriage, Equality and Subsidizing Families in Liberal Public Justification," in the Journal of Moral Philosophy, Forthcoming. (link to source)


Joseph Massad
"Benjamin Netanyahu is insistent that no progress will take place in the so-called peace process unless the Palestinians officially recognize Israel's right to be a racist Jewish state."

Joseph Massad, associate professor of modern Arab politics and intellectual history at Columbia University, speaking at the Church of the Holy Trinity in New York City, October 27, 2009. (link to source)


Ingrid Mattson
"I don't understand why the Muslim-American community has to take responsibility for him. The Army has had at least as much time and opportunity to form and shape this person as the Muslim community."

Ingrid Mattson, professor of Islamic Studies and Christian-Muslim Relations and Director at the Macdonald Center for Islamic Studies at Hartford Seminary, on Fort Hood shooter Major Nidal Malik Hasan, New York Times, November 8, 2009. (link to source)


Rashid Khalidi
"Abbas is too feeble to negotiate because the Israelis disdain him.... Hamas is also too weak to carry out its chosen strategy of what it calls 'resistance' --they haven't fired a rocket in almost nine months since the Israeli attack on Gaza ended in January. And so really this is a totally unsatisfactory situation."

Rashid Khalidi, Edward Said Professor of Modern Arab Studies at Columbia University, as quoted in an interview with the Council of Foreign Relations on "The Tragedy of Palestinian Divisions," October 29, 2009. (link to source)


Hamid Dabashi
"They are made invisible...they are nonexistent. One can travel through Palestine and never see Palestinians."

Hamid Dabashi, Hagop Kevorkian Professor of Iranian Studies and Comparative Literature at Columbia University, as quoted in the "Columbia Spectator," October 8, 2009. (link to source)


Lucy K. Pick
"The Danish anti-Islamic cartoons published by Jyllands-Posten on September 30, 2005 are...far from being a bold and innovative defence of Western values...instead the latest manifestation of a long medieval European tradition of seeking out martyrdom by deliberately insulting Islam in general and the Prophet Muhammad in particular."

Lucy K. Pick, director of undergraduate studies and senior lecturer in the history of Christianity in the Divinity School, University of Chicago, in "Orientalism and Religion," published in "Orientalism's Wake: The Ongoing Politics of a Polemic," in Viewpoints, No. 12, September 2009; the Middle East Institute, Washington, D.C.. (link to source)


Juan Cole
"By talking about 'patriots' 'protecting' the individual right to bear arms, Palin skated awfully close to the militia or 'patriot' movement on the right-wing American fringe (and not for the first time). Ahmadinejad is not similarly in favor of all citizens having guns, but he comes out of a popular militia, the Basij, which consists of hundreds of thousands of ordinary citizen patriots, armed and pledged to defend the constitution of the Islamic Republic."

Juan Cole, University of Michigan history professor, equating former Alaska governor and Republican vice-presidential candidate Sarah Palin's support for 2nd amendment rights with contested Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's involvement with the oppressive Basij militia, Salon.com, August 3, 2009. (link to source)


John Esposito
"The conflict taking place at present between the Islamic world and the West is not because of doctrinal or civilization differences but because of the adoption of double standards towards the Islamic world. Some groups and lobbies, which have an influence over decision making in the West, support the practice of this erroneous policy."

John Esposito, founding director of the Prince Alwaleed bin Talal Center for Mulsim-Christian Understanding at Georgetown, speaking recently at the World Association of Al-Azhar Graduates in Cairo, as quoted in Asharq Alawsat, July 16, 2009. (link to source)


Muqtedar Khan
"I fear that the Ahmadinejad-Netanyahu duo might audaciously mug us of the hopes for a peaceful and just solution to the Arab-Israeli problem inspired by President Obama."

Muqtedar Khan, director of Islamic studies at the University of Delaware, discussing the repercussions of the uprising in Iran in "Threatened Hopes," published in the Daily Times (Pakistan), June 28, 2009. (link to source)


John Voll
"The parallel would be for a deputy sheriff to require a woman going through security to take off her brassiere right there in the inspection section."

John Voll, professor of Islamic history and associate director of the Prince Alwaleed bin Talal Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding at Georgetown University, as quoted in the June 5, 2009 Baltimore Sun asserting that Muslim women passing through security checkpoints at court houses should not be required to remove their hijab or niqab. (link to source)


Joseph Massad
"As Palestinians are murdered and injured in the thousands, world powers are cheering on. This is hardly a new development. It happens often in the context of other populations being murdered by allies of the US and Europe, and it even happened during World War II as the Nazi genocide was proceeding."

Joseph Massad, Columbia University associate professor of modern Arab politics and intellectual history, in "The Gaza Ghetto Uprising," which appeared in The Electronic Intifada, January 4, 2009. A photo of Nazi troops rounding up Polish Jews during the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising of May, 1943, accompanied the article. (link to source)


Sondra Hale
"This is the role of the Center for Near Eastern Studies – to bring us programs of this sort."

Sondra Hale, professor of anthropology and women's studies at UCLA, responding to a February 19, 2009 student op-ed in the Daily Bruin on a UCLA symposium on "Human Rights and Gaza" that, in the words of Campus Watch contributor Eric Golub, "instructed attendees on how best to spread anti-Zionism, anti-Semitism, and anti-Americanism." (link to source)


Gabriel Piterberg
"For political and military elites in Israel, and the War on Terror constituency in the US, the killing of Arabs and Muslims no longer requires any weeping or soul-searching. It's just what freedom-loving people do."

Gabriel Piterberg, professor of history at UCLA, writing about Gaza in the January 29, 2009 issue of the London Review of Books. (link to source)


Joshua Schreier
"This class traces the history of the Israel-Palestine conflict from its roots during the late Ottoman period through the current period. Students should keep in mind that this course is NOT designed to present 'an objective' account of a 'two-sided' conflict. The fact that there are supposedly two sides does not obligate us to portray each as equally right and/or equally wrong."

Joshua Schreier, assistant professor of history at Vassar College, in the introduction to the syllabus for History 214, The Roots of the Palestine-Israel Conflict, which Schreier taught during the Fall 2008 semester. (link to source)


Muqtedar Khan
"[G]overnments continue to avoid addressing root causes [of terrorism] such as Palestine and Kashmir. Increasingly abuse of Islam, its values, its history and its symbols is being used as a weapon in the war on terror and this too continues to win more recruits for the extremists."

Muqtedar Khan, director of Islamic studies at the University of Delaware, in "Losing the War on Terror," published at On Faith, a web log of the Washington Post, December 1, 2008. (link to source)


Rashid Khalidi
"Third, this war will be fought because these neoconservatives desire to make the Middle East safe not for democracy, but for Israeli hegemony. They are convinced that the Middle East is irremediably hostile to both the United States and Israel; and they firmly hold the racist view that Middle Easterners understand only force. For these American Likudniks and their Israeli counterparts, sad to say, the tragedy of September 11 was a godsend: It enabled them to draft the United States to help fight Israel's enemies."

Rashid Khalidi, Edward Said Professor of Arab Studies and director of the Middle East Institute at Columbia University, in "Attack Iraq?," pubiished in "In These Times," January 27, 2003. (link to source)


John Esposito
"You have myself and others who think roughly in the same school of thought. And you have a second school of thought represented by people like Bernard Lewis, Daniel Pipes, Steve Emerson, Martin Kramer, and legion. But of course we know that Christ cast out the legion of devils, but I won't go that way"

John Esposito, Founding Director of the Prince Alwaleed bin Talal Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding at Georgetown University, speaking at Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne on Wednesday, September 24, 2008. (link to source)


Joel Beinin
"The American empire is going down."

Joel Beinin, Stanford history professor and former president of the Middle East Studies Association, during a September 2, 2008 taping of the Peninsula Peace and Justice Center cable television program, "Other Voices." (link to source)


John Esposito
"Sami is dedicated family man....Sami Al-Arian is a proud, dedicated and committed American as well as a proud and committed Palestinian. He is an extraordinarily bright, articulate scholar and intellectual-activist, a man of conscience with a strong commitment to peace and social justice."

John Esposito, Founding Director of the Prince Alwaleed bin Talal Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding at Georgetown University, in a July 2, 2008 letter to U.S. District Judge Leonie Brinkema in support of granting bond for Sami Al-Arian, who pled guilty in 2006 to conspiring to provide goods and services to the Palestinian Islamic Jihad, and who awaits an August 13 trial for criminal contempt. (link to source)


Rashid Khalidi
"If there is to be a resolution of the Palestine problem, it depends on the Palestinians' understanding the massive disadvantages they labor under in fighting a struggle for liberation against the heirs of the victims of the Holocaust, in the growing shadow of worldwide Islamophobia."

Rashid Khalidi, Edward Said Professor of Arabic Studies at Columbia University, in "Palestine: Liberation Deferred," which appeared in The Nation, May 8, 2008. (link to source)


David E. Long
"'No university will accept money with strings on it,' said the Middle East Institute's David Long. 'Period. Academic freedom in our country is a cornerstone of academic discourse, and that will not be breached by any university that I know of.' According to Long, there's no grand Saudi strategy to influence America's view of Islam. 'Yes, they want to help Islam, just like we have foreign missionaries,' Long explained. 'But I think there's a lot of fear about abilities that I don't really think they have.'"

David E. Long, consultant on the Middle East and international terrorism, retired U.S. State Department diplomat, and former adjunct professor at Georgetown and Johns Hopkins University, in a Christian Broadcasting Network (CBN) segment on Saudi funding for Middle East studies; aired March 10, 2008. (link to source)


Joel Beinin
"Who are you? Who are you? You are a nothing! I am a professor! You can only have an opinion! I have knowledge!"

Joel Beinin, director of Middle East studies at the American University in Cairo and on leave from Stanford, reacting to a question from audience member Scott Abramson following a December 2, 2003 lecture Beinin gave at Grace Baptist Church, San Jose, California; reported to Campus Watch in reaction to a web log post from February 15, 2008. (link to source)


Hatem Bazian
"In remembering Edward Said we are putting Palestine on the map—although it never left."

Hatem Bazian, lecturer in Arabic at the University of California, Berkeley, speaking at the dedication of a mural of Edward Said at San Francisco State University, November 2, 2007. (link to source)


Yvonne Y. Haddad
"Sometimes outside intervention and pressure is counterproductive. They will change when they are ready to change. [Other] Saudi women said they wouldn't have it any other way."

Yvonne Y. Haddad, professor of the history of Islam at the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding at Georgetown University, as quoted in the Middle East Times, February 7, 2008, on concerns voiced by the United Nations and human rights organizations over the lack of progress made in securing women's rights in Saudi Arabia "as mounting pressure on the kingdom fails to stem violence against women." (link to source)


Rashid Khalidi
"There's one thing that should be said about Habash, which is that he was a fierce secularist. It's interesting, if you go back and look at the degree to which he and his comrades in the PFLP argued for the separation of religion and politics...in effect, I think it'd have to be argued, sort of Cold War imperatives led these secular, Marxist, leftist, radical groups to be seen as enemies by people like the Israeli intelligence and American intelligence services who, in the case of the Israelis, cultivated their Islamic rivals, giving us later on groups like Hamas."

Rashid Khalidi, Edward Said Professor of Arabic Studies at Columbia University, speaking on January 27, 2008 with Andrea Seabrook of NPR about the late Palestinian terrorist George Habash. (link to source)


Juan Cole
"The Bush administration's assertion that 5 small Iranian boats confronted big, well-armed US ships in the Straits of Hormuz and threatened to blow up the American vessels is looking more and more like a serious error if not a Republican Party fabrication."

Juan Cole, professor of history at the University of Michigan and former president of the Middle East Studies Association, writing at his blog, Informed Comment, January 11, 2008. (link to source)


Richard Bulliet
"You have a big chunk of the [Middle Eastern history] specialist community that starts every sentence with the word Palestine. And they have successfully from 1967 onwards, partly through the extraordinary skills of Yassir Arafat, to turn this side-show into a great world concern so that it's a given in many, many quarters in the Arab world that all problems stem from the Palestine question. That's a great sell. Certainly it's succeeded on this campus."

Richard Bulliet, professor of Middle East history at Columbia University, in an interview with The BWOG at Columbia, September 27, 2007. (link to source)


Richard Bulliet
"We never saw Saddam Hussein up close in a question-and-answer session with an American college audience. My guess is that if we had, we would have found him odious. But I'm not absolutely sure because, like everyone else, I relied on a journalistic profession that was undergoing a (temporary?) lapse of scruple."

Richard Bulliet, professor of Middle East history at Columbia University, writing in the Columbia Spectator, September 24, 2007, in defense of Columbia president Lee Bollinger's decision to invite Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad to speak on campus. (link to source)


Juan Cole
"Gaza is the worst outcome of Western colonialism anywhere in the world outside the Belgian Congo."

Juan Cole, professor of history at the University of Michigan and former president of the Middle East Studies Association (MESA), writing at his web log, Informed Comment, September 18, 2007. (link to source)


Hamid Dabashi
"Leonidas' mission in Snyder's 300 is an act of suicidal violence -- a suicidal violence that if performed by white people in remote corners of history is heroic but if by Palestinians or Iraqis then it becomes sign [sic] of barbarism....What Snyder actually portrays (for the whole world to see) is the best picture of the US army in action. That monstrosity that Snyder pictures marching towards Thermopylae is the American empire -- and that band of brothers that stood up to that monstrosity are those resisting this empire: they are the Iraqi resistance, the Palestinians, Hizbullah."

Hamid Dabashi, Hagop Kevorkian Professor of Iranian Studies and Comparative Literature of Columbia University, reviewing the film "300" in Al-Ahram Weekly Online, August 2-8, 2007. (link to source)


William O. Beeman
"If the talks are to be about stability in Iraq, the United States must not bias them by making pre-conditions about other issues - such as Iran's nuclear program. It must acknowledge that Iran has an equal and respected position in creating stability in the region. Language must be unfailingly polite and humble."

William O. Beeman, chairman of the department of anthropology at the University of Minnesota and president of the Middle East section of the American Anthropological Association; in "How to Talk the Talk with Iran," New American Media, July 23, 2007. (link to source)


Joshua Landis
"Anti-Semitism in the Middle East is growing steadily as the situation in Palestine becomes ever more hopeless and depressing for Arab viewers. The war in Iraq and proliferation of violent Islamist groups and rhetoric is fanning the flames of anti-Semitism."

Joshua Landis, assistant professor of Middle East studies and co-director of the Center for Peace Studies at the University of Oklahoma, as quoted in the New York Observer, July 12, 2007. (link to source)


Jessica Stern
"I've heard a lot of bashing of Muslim clerics for not stepping up to the plate and condemning extremist violence...But Catholic priests are not stepping up to condemn those who kill abortion doctors...[and] rabbis are not condemning the violent settlers' movement."

Jessica Stern of Harvard's Kennedy School speaking at a June 14 conference at the EastWest Institute. (link to source)


Rashid Khalidi
"I think that this is a direct, logical, inevitable result of American, Israeli and European policy. The foolishness and the irresponsibility of the Palestinian leadership played an enormous role. But while this has to be laid at the doorstep of Bush administration and Israeli government policy, they almost willed this result. They refused to deal with anybody. They refused to negotiate. They refused to try and bring along the people with whom they could have negotiated, including leaders of Hamas. And this is the logical, inevitable, natural result."

Rashid Khalidi, Edward Said Professor of Arab Studies and director of the Middle East Institute at Columbia University, speaking of the Hamas takeover of Gaza on National Public Radio, June 16, 2007. (link to source)


Omid Safi
"Given what's happened in Iraq and Palestine, I would be shocked if there wasn't discontent."

Omid Safi, associate professor of religious studies at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, speaking to the Associated Press on June 7, 2007, regarding the recent Pew Research Center Poll showing that 26 percent of American Muslim between the ages of 18 and 29 say that suicide bombing is justified in at least some circumstances. (link to source)


Rashid Khalidi
"But Camp David was a terrible step in the wrong direction, in my view. I think it's to his [Jimmy Carter's] discredit that he then failed to get Begin to do what we all know Begin wasn't intending to do."

Rashid Khalidi, Edward Said Professor of Arab Studies and Director of the Middle East Institute at Columbia University, speaking about Jimmy Carter to reporter Gaby Wood in The Observer, May 27, 2007. (link to source)


Saree Makdisi
"[Israel's] demand that its 'right to exist' be recognized reflects its own anxiety, not about its existence but about its failure to successfully eliminate the Palestinians' presence inside their homeland — a failure for which verbal recognition would serve merely a palliative and therapeutic function."

Saree Makdisi, professor of English at UCLA, writing about Israel's demand that the Palestinians recognize its right to exist, on his blog, Saree Maksisi Archives, April 22, 2007. (link to source)


John Esposito
"While stories on global terrorism and domestic threats are important to us all, at the same time how many stories have gone one step further and focused on the thousands of Muslims indiscriminately arrested, detained, monitored and interviewed and not found guilt or released for lack of evidence; the number of Islamic charities shut down but despite the passage of years not successfully prosecuted; the continued detention of Muslims like Prof. Sami al-Arian..."

John Esposito, founding director of the Prince Alwaleed bin Talal Center at Georgetown University, blogging on March 28, 2007 at On Faith about Sami al-Arian, the former University of South Flordia professor imprisoned for aiding the terrorist organization Palestinian Islamic Jihad. (link to source)


"It is within the context of that distinctive history of archaeological practice and settler nationhood that one can understand why is was that 'thousands of Palestinians stormed the site' of Joseph's Tomb in the West Bank city of Nablus, looting it and setting it alight during the renewed Intifada that rocked Palestine and Israel in the fall of 2000."

Barnard College professor Nadia Abu El-Haj, from page 281 of her book, "Facts on the Ground: Archaeological Practice and Territorial Self-Fashioning in Israeli Society," Chicago, 2002. (link to source)


Natana DeLong-Bas
"I do not find any evidence that makes me agree that Osama bin Laden was behind the attack on the twin trade towers. All we have heard from him was simply a praise and commendation of those who had carried out the operation."

Natana DeLong-Bas, Lecturer in Theology at Boston College and in the Department of Near East and Judaic Studies at Brandeis, as quoted by Al-Sharq Al-Awsat in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, December 21, 2006. (link to source)


Fawaz Gerges
"I really believe that both the Jews and the Palestinians, basically, are, have suffered from similar historical injustices."

ABC News analyst and Sarah Lawrence College professor Fawaz Gerges, speaking about the Holocaust denial conference in Tehran on the NPR show "Talk of the Nation" with Lynn Neary, December 14, 2006. (link to source)


Juan Cole
"You have to have very thick skin and, I think, you have to just not care about the career ladder or social climbing of other sorts to risk it."

Juan Cole, professor of history at the University of Michigan, in a November 22 blog entry on the risks that blogging poses to one's academic career. He also claimed that free speech in academe is threatened by outsiders who criticize Middle East studies. Prof. Cole neglected to mention his unsuccessful attempts to climb the career ladder to jobs at Duke and Yale. (link to source)


Seyyed Hossain Nasr
"The statements, not only of the Pope, but similar statements, themselves are acts of violence to the sacred realities that another civilization holds very dear."

Seyyed Hossain Nasr, University Professor of Islamic Studies at George Washington University, speaking on the Diane Rehm radio show on September 19, 2006 in a discussion of Pope Benedict XVI's recent lecture at the University of Regensberg, (link to source)


Mansour Farhang
"If you put a gun to my head and said choose between Ahmadinejad and Bush, I might say, 'Shoot.'"

Mansour Farhang, a professor of international relations and Middle Eastern politics at Bennington College, as quoted in the October 13, 2006 Chronicle of Higher Education.


Ian Lustick
"There is no winning this war, because the war on terror is the enemy."

Ian Lustick, Bess W. Heyman Chair of political science at the University of Pennsylvania, speaking at Penn about his new book, Trapped in the War on Terror, on September 21, 2006. (link to source)


Fawaz Gerges
"...Because it is not inflammatory, at least not in the context of Islamic culture. 'We must not try to interpret Islamic terms and cultural signals by using our Western ideas,' said Fawaz Gerges, a professor in the department of international affairs and Middle Eastern studies at Sarah Lawrence College, and an ABC News consultant. Gerges pointed out that in Islamic culture 'ghadab' means anger or frustration. A day of rage does not mean a day of jihad (war), added Gerges."

Fawaz Gerges, commenting September 18 on Qatari Islamic scholar Yusuf al-Qaradawi's call for a "Day of Rage" on Friday, September 22, in response to Pope Benedict XVI's recent comments on Islam. (link to source)


Jessica Stern
"Jihad has become a global fad, rather like gangsta rap."

Jessica Stern, lecturer on terrorism at Harvard University, explaining the surge in Islamist violence, August 1, 2006. (link to source)


Kevin Barrett
"I do know — I don't believe — I know that 9/11 was an inside job."

Kevin Barrett, adjunct instructor at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, on 9/11, in a television interview on July 10, 2006. (link to source)


Juan Cole
"I win, every day."

Juan Cole, professor of history at the University of Michigan, summing up his response to critics after he was denied a tenured faculty position at Yale, June 9, 2006. (link to source)


Hamid Dabashi
"The Iranian human-rights record is atrocious, as is the human-rights record of any country including the U.S."

Hamid Dabashi, Professor of Iranian studies at Columbia University commenting on Iran's record of human rights, May 6, 2006 (link to source)


Ian Lustick
"Hamas is mainly popular because one of the things it is trusted to do is probably be ready to live with Israel, even if not officially, for a very long time."

Ian Lustick, the Bess W. Heyman Professor of Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania, commenting on the February 2006 electoral triumph of the Palestinian terrorist group, Hamas (March 22, 2006). (link to source)


Mark LeVine
"As far as I can tell, American empire is safe and secure, despite my best efforts to topple it (although Musab al-Zarqawi seems to be doing a good job in Iraq)."

Mark LeVine, University of California at Irvine professor of modern Middle Eastern history, culture, and Islamic studies, discussing the his appearance in David Horowitz's new book "The Professors: The 101 Most Dangerous Academics in America," February 26, 2006. (link to source)


Mark LeVine
"In this sense, a strong showing from Hamas, even its assumption of power would likely be the best thing that could happen to what remains of the peace process."

Mark LeVine, University of California at Irvine professor of modern Middle Eastern history, culture, and Islamic studies, discussing the prospect of Hamas winning the Palestinian elections, January 22, 2006. (link to source)


Roger Allen
"I am not convinced that government and academia are on the same page as to what the goals of this initiative should be...the people who are making decisions are not the people with expertise in the language and culture of the Middle East."

Roger Allen, University of Pennsylvania professor of Arabic language and literature, commenting on the Bush Administration's proposed National Security Language Initiative, January 13, 2006. (link to source)


F. Gregory Gause III
"In this country, where we even had to use "national defense" as the justification to build our interstate highway system, you just can't squeeze enough money out of the mountebanks, charlatans, ideologues and goobers who represent us in Congress to fund these programs unless they can be sold as "national defense" (or now, "homeland security")."

F. Gregory Gause III, professor of Middle East politics at the University of Vermont, commenting on the newly announced National Security Language Initiative, January 5, 2006. (link to source)


Olivier Roy
"It is nothing to do with radical Islam or even Muslims... these guys are building a new idea of themselves based on American street culture."

Olivier Roy, research director at the French National Centre for Scientific Research, commenting on the rioting in France, November 7, 2005. (link to source)


Joshua Landis
"Nonetheless, the two countries have much to talk about: both are trying to solve their Iraq problems. They share a common interest in subduing jihadism and helping Iraq build stability. But instead of helping Syria help the United States, Washington prefers to make demands."

University of Oklahoma professor Joshua Landis, advocating changes in American policy toward Syria, September 17, 2005. (link to source)


Bruce Lawrence
"If you read him in his own words, he sounds like somebody who would be a very high-minded and welcome voice in global politics."

Duke University religion professor Bruce Lawrence, discussing his collection of Osama bin Laden's speeches and interviews, September 13, 2005. (link to source)


Ted Swedenburg
"Many of the clauses in the new [Iraqi] constitution are "extremely problematic" when compared to the progressive laws concerning women's rights under the secular regime of Saddam Hussein, [professor of anthropology Ted] Swedenburg said."

University of Arkansas anthropology professor Ted Swedenburg discussing legal protections for women's rights in the new Iraqi constitution, September 9, 2005. (link to source)


Juan Cole
"According to the September 11 Commission report, al-Qaeda conceived 9/11 in some large part as a punishment on the US for supporting Ariel Sharon's iron fist policies toward the Palestinians. Bin Laden had wanted to move the operation up in response to Sharon's threatening visit to the Temple Mount, and again in response to the Israeli attack on the Jenin refugee camp, which left 4,000 persons homeless. Khalid Shaikh Muhammad argued in each case that the operation just was not ready," July 8, 2005.

University of Michigan professor of History Juan Cole, commenting on the alleged relationship between 9/11 and events in Israel. Martin Kramer points out that the 9/11 Commission determined the hijacking plan was conceived by early 1999, that Sharon's visit to the Temple Mount took place in September 2000 when he was head of the opposition, and that the Jenin operation took place in April 2002, seven months after 9/11. After these factual problems were pointed out Cole changed his original posting. The original text is reproduced on Martin Kramer's web site and is linked here. (link to source)


Ernest R. May
"The staff statements, read out at the beginning of relevant public hearings, contributed to the development of a common voice. Work on these statements sometimes went on through entire nights. The effect was to produce agreed-upon language, some of which would be borrowed for the final report. The process heightened everyone's sensitivity to terms and meanings. (One endless debate concerned the question of whether "Islamism" and "Islamic extremism" were synonyms.)"

Ernest R. May, Charles Warren Professor of American History at Harvard University, discussing the internal deliberations of 9/11 Commission, to which he was a consultant, May 23, 2005. (link to source)


John Esposito
"I have the world's greatest job because I've been saying the same thing for 30 years. Can anybody else make that claim?"

Georgetown University professor John Esposito speaking about "Understanding Islam" at the University of Missouri, April 11, 2005 (link to source)


Rashid Khalidi
"Experts and non-experts alike have tried to implant the American ideal of Jeffersonian democracy in the Middle East, Khalidi said. But the democratic ideal "doesn't really exist in the U.S. either," he said, leaving Westerners to foist an unrealistic political vision on Middle Eastern societies."

Columbia University professor Rashid Khalidi commenting on American efforts to encourage democratic reforms in the Middle East, March 31, 2005. (link to source)


Juan Cole
"The rightwing Zionists want to racialize the Sudan conflict in American terms, as "Arab" versus "black African" because they want to use it to play American domestic politics, and create a rift among African-Americans and Arab-Americans. Both of the latter face massive discrimination in contemporary society, and they should find ways of cooperating to counter it. "

University of Michigan history professor Juan Cole, commenting on the situation in Darfur, March 27, 2005 (link to source)


Juan Cole
"The cynical use by the US Republican Party of the Terri Schiavo case repeats, whether deliberately or accidentally, the tactics of Muslim fundamentalists and theocrats in places like Egypt and Pakistan. These tactics involve a disturbing tendency to make private, intimate decisions matters of public interest and then to bring the courts and the legislature to bear on them. President George W. Bush and Republican congressional leaders like Tom Delay have taken us one step closer to theocracy on the Muslim Brotherhood model."

University of Michigan Associate Professor of History Juan Cole, commenting on the Terri Schiavo case, March 22, 2005. (link to source)


Yvonne Haddad
"It's a time when people can get away with anything,...When people have a breakdown of traditional leadership, largely because the U.S. government has delegitimized the Muslim leadership in America, American Muslims are searching for new leaders more able to address their daily needs...People in America think they are going to be the vanguards of change...But for Arab Muslims in the Middle East, American Muslims continue to be viewed on the margins of the faith."

Georgetown University professor of Islamic studies Yvonne Haddad, commenting on a Muslim prayer service led by a woman, Amina Wadud, professor of Islamic studies at Virginia Commonwealth University, March 18, 2005. (link to source)


Rashid Khalidi
"Iraq was easy prey, but the (Bush administration's) lies fell apart," Khalidi said. "Iraq was governed by one of the worst administrations in the world, but there are problems with the government in Egypt, Saudi Arabia and (other places, too)."

Rashid Khalidi, professor of Arab Studies and director of the Middle East Institute at Columbia University, commenting on the Bush Administration's Iraq policy, February 3, 2005. (link to source)


Rashid Khalidi
Merely holding an election is "a pretty low bar... But then, this election is being run with Main Street, U.S.A., more in mind than Main Street, Baghdad, and for them to get away with saying such things depends on our collective gullibility."

Rashid Khalidi, professor of Arab Studies and director of the Middle East Institute at Columbia University, commenting on the Iraqi elections, January 27, 2005 (link to source)


Michael C. Hudson
"When our government blunders clumsily, often with lethal force, into Middle East situations, which about our leaders are not only nearly totally ignorant but about which they entertain politically colored Orientalist stereotypes. And, when right-wing ideologues have the chutzpah to denigrate the American Middle East studies academic community for failing to alert the nation to the terrorist threats when it is these ideologues themselves who have grievously damaged American national security."

Michael C. Hudson, Seif Global Professor of Arab Studies and professor of international relations, and current Director of the Center for Contemporary Arab Studies at Georgetown University, commenting on America's "imperial overreach," January 22, 2005. (link to source)


Tariq Ramadan
"From Shakespeare to Hume, the influences of Islamic civilisation on the literary and philosophical traditions of the time are innumerable."

Tariq Ramadan, professor of philosophy at the College of Geneva and Professor of Islamic Studies at the University of Fribourg, commenting on the Islamic contribution to European civilization, January 21, 2005. (link to source)


Juan Cole
"If Rice is going to be a successful Secretary of State, she simply has to get back control of US foreign policy from the Likudniks in the Bush administration."

Juan Cole, Professor of Modern Middle East and South Asian History at the University of Michigan, commenting on the Senate confirmation hearings of Condolezza Rice, Januar 20, 2005. (link to source)


Richard Bulliet
"The university should have looked at MEALAC five or ten years ago...It's become locked into a postmodernist, postcolonialist point of view, one that wasn't necessarily well adapted to giving students instruction about the Middle East."

Richard Bulliet, Professor of History at Columbia University, commenting on that university's Department of Middle East and Asian Languages and Cultures, January 10, 2005. (link to source)


M. Shahid Alam
"On September 11, 2001, nineteen Arab hijackers too demonstrated their willingness to die - and to kill - for their dream. They died so that their people might live, free and in dignity."

M. Shahid Alam professor of Economics at Northeastern University, explaining the hijackers' motivation for attacking on 9/11, December 29, 2004. (link to source)


Joseph Massad
"All those in the Arab world who deny the Jewish holocaust are in my opinion Zionists."

Columbia University professor of Modern Arab Politics and Intellectual History Joseph Massad interpreting Arab Holocaust denial as a form of Zionism, December 15, 2004. (link to source)


Joel Beinin
"The state of Israel exists because, in different ways, the United States and the Soviet Union thought that establishing it was the best way to reduce British influence in the Middle East."

Stanford professor of Middle Eastern history Joel Beinin commenting on the creation of the State of Israel, December 3, 2004. (link to source)


Glenn E. Robinson
"He was, in a sense, a Moses- like figure, leading his people within sight of the Promised Land," said Glenn E. Robinson, an expert on Palestinian affairs at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, Calif., and author of "Building a Palestinian State: The Incomplete Revolution." Ultimately, though, "Arafat couldn't get there himself."

Glenn E. Robinson, commenting on the death of Yassir Arafat, November 10, 2004 (link to source)


Juan Cole
"Its support for Hizbullah in southern Lebanon is "terror" only in the sense that Israeli support for Gush Emunim in the West Bank is "terror." Indeed, the Likud policy in the West Bank is far worse than the policies of Hizbullah,since the Lebanese Shiites just want their own territory to be free of foreign occupation--they aren't expanding into other people's back yards."

Juan Cole, Professor of Modern Middle East and South Asian History at the History Department of the University of Michigan, comparing the Likud party in Israel to Hizbullah in Southern Lebanon, October, 11, 2004. (link to source)


Juan Cole
"The Likud Coalition in Israel does contest elections. But it isn't morally superior in most respects to the Syrian Baath."

Juan Cole, Professor of Modern Middle East and South Asian History at the History Department of the University of Michigan, comparing the Likud party in Israel to the Syrian Baath party, September, 9, 2004. (link to source)


M Shahid Alam
"Now, more than a year after a failed occupation of Iraq, after the revelations of systematic torture by Americans in Iraq, Afghanistan and Guantanamo Bay, after the erosion of liberties inside the United States, after the establishment of an American Gulag whose geographic expanse exceeds anything established by the Soviet Union, American prestige in the world has sunk to the lowest point in its history."

M. Shahid Alam is Professor of Economics at Northeastern University, Boston commenting on America's war on terror and on her policy in Iraq, September, 2, 2004. (link to source)


Juan Cole
"It is an echo of the one-two punch secretly planned by the pro-Likud faction in the Department of Defense. First, Iraq would be taken out by the United States, and then Iran.... These pro-Likud intellectuals concluded that 9/11 would give them carte blanche to use the Pentagon as Israel's Gurkha regiment, fighting elective wars on behalf of Tel Aviv (not wars that really needed to be fought, but wars that the Likud coalition thought it would be nice to see fought so as to increase Israel's ability to annex land and act aggressively, especially if someone else's boys did the dying)..."

Juan Cole, Professor of Modern Middle East and South Asian History at the History Department of the University of Michigan, explaining the espionage allegations against Lawrence Franklin, a Pentagon analyst, claiming that he passed on to Israel classified documents on Iran through AIPAC, August 29, 2004. (link to source)


Juan Cole
"He worries that offering pointed commentary could damage his academic credibility, but at this point he feels a moral obligation to point out ' the very bad foreign policy mistakes' the United States continues to commit."

Juan Cole, Professor of Modern Middle East and South Asian History at the History Department of the University of Michigan, explaining the reasons for his commentary on the situation in Iraq , August 25, 2004 (link to source)


Juan Cole
"If the Bush/Cheney team gets back in, there will be further wars and massive disturbances to world peace and security, starting with Iran. Maybe the whole doctrine of pre-emptive war is a form of inferiority complex, impelling Cheney to be a strident war-monger to try to vindicate his uninvolved youth. If he was a coward, he may be endangering us all (and especially our teenagers) in a desperate ploy to regain his own manhood."

Juan Cole, Professor of Modern Middle East and South Asian History at the History Department of the University of Michigan, analyzing Vice President Dick Cheney's character of , August 17, 2004. (link to source)


Karen Armstrong
"In a lengthy interview, she spoke of how U.S. President George W. Bush and Osama bin Laden parody each other with their talk of black and white, good and evil. Ms. Armstrong said that, throughout history, when religious fundamentalist movements have been attacked they have become more extreme. The way we're going -- and Britain is just as culpable as the United States -- we're alienating Muslims who were initially horrified by Sept. 11 and we're strengthening al-Qaeda, which has definitely been strengthened by the Iraq war and its awful aftermath."

British historian Karen Armstrong warning that fighting Islamist terror groups actually makes them stronger, August 6, 2004. (link to source)


Mark LeVine
"All military and diplomatic agreements and aid to Middle Eastern countries that aren't democratic or don't respect the rights of the peoples under their control should be suspended. Yes, this means for Israel as well as Egypt, Jordan, Saudi Arabia and other 'allies' and 'partners'."

Mark LeVine, associate professor of modern Middle Eastern history, culture and Islamic studies at the University of California, Irvine commenting on the steps the United States needs to take if she wants to have peace with the Muslim world, August 6, 2004. (link to source)


Juan Cole
"Even medieval Islamic law recognized the right of Christians, Jews and other monotheists to practice their religion and enjoy rights to their lives and property. This relative tolerance has often been enhanced in the twentieth century by the rise of nationalism, wherein Arab Christians sometimes are privileged as symbols of national authenticity, because Christianity predated Islam in the nation's history."

Juan Cole, Professor of Modern Middle East and South Asian History at the History Department of the University of Michigan, claiming that Islamic law and practice has resulted in respect for Christians and other minorities that has been enhanced by Arab nationalism, August 3, 2004. (link to source)


Juan Cole
"No American media will report the demonstrations in Israel as fascist in nature, and no American politicians will dare criticize the Likud. But the fact is that the Israeli predations in the West Bank and Gaza are a key source of rage in the Muslim world against the United States (which toadies unbearably to whatever garbage comes out of Tel Aviv's political establishment), something that the 9/11 commission report stupidly denies."

Juan Cole, Professor of Modern Middle East and South Asian History at the History Department of the University of Michigan, commenting on the non-violent human chain Israeli protestors formed between Gaza and Jerusalem, July 26, 2004. (link to source)


Juan Cole
"The nexus of disinformation about the Saddam government and about terrorist activity in Iraq may lie in tales fed to Mossad by the Kurds, who in turn passed it to Washington. The Kurds have steadily and implausibly alleged a Saddam/al-Qaeda connection."

Juan Cole, professor of Modern Middle East and South Asian History at the History Department of the University of Michigan, blaming the Kurds and Israeli intelligence for the U.S. occupation of Iraq, June 21, 2004. (link to source)


Scott Alexander
"[W]hen Palestinians refer to Jews as 'descended from apes and swine' or encourage support for those who 'kill Jews,' they do so with the reasonably justifiable self-image of victim and persecuted, not of victimizer and persecutor."

Scott Alexander, associate professor of Islam at Catholic Theological Union in Chicago, speaking on June 8, 2004, in his capacity as planned expert witness in the defense of Fawaz Damra, on trial in Cleveland, Ohio, for immigration fraud and concealing terrorist ties. On June 15, Mr. Alexander, after deciding not to testify on behalf of Damra, stated: "Mr. Damra did indeed promote violence and hatred. I unreservedly condemn the speeches and actions of Mr. Damra in the early 1990s when he was advocating and helping to raise money for movements that perpetrate violent attacks on Israeli citizens." (link to source)


Rashid Khalidi
"Experts can be wrong, but the dedicated [Middle East studies] professionals have often been prescient in their warnings."

Columbia University historian Rashid Khalidi in a May 27, 2004 talk at UCLA for the Center for Near Eastern Studies. (link to source)


Joel Beinin
"Israel did not face an existential danger in 1967."

Joel Beinin, professor of Middle Eastern History at Stanford commenting on the Arab-Israeli wars since the Six Day War, May 13, 2004. (link to source)


Hatem Bazian
"It's about time that we have an intifada in this country that change fundamentally the political dynamics in here."

Hatem Bazian, a senior lecturer in Islamic studies at Berkeley, at a rally in San Francisco organized by the far left group A.N.S.W.E.R. in response to the increased fighting in the Iraqi city of Fallujah, April 10, 2004. (link to source)


Juan Cole
"What would drive the crowd to this barbaric behavior? It is not that they are pro-Saddam any more, or that they hate 'freedom.' They are using a theater of the macabre to protest their occupation and humiliation by foreign armies. They were engaging in a role reversal, with the American cadavers in the position of the 'helpless' and the 'humiliated,' and with themselves playing the role of the powerful monster that inscribes its will on these bodies.."

Juan Cole, professor of Modern Middle East and South Asian History at the History Department of the University of Michigan, talking about the latest bombing in Fallujah where 9 Americans were killed and their bodies desecrated, April 1, 2004. (link to source)


Juan Cole
"Iraq [under Saddam Hussein] was a rather nasty one-party state."

Juan Cole, professor of Modern Middle East and South Asian History at the History Department of the University of Michigan, talking at Indiana University on ‘The War on Terrorism and Islam in Bush administration policy', March 30, 2004. (link to source)


Gabriel Piterberg
"[Iraqi resistance] happened quicker than I thought it would. Anyone who knows the history of colonial occupation should have been aware of this. It's horrendous in the sense that the health, social life, economic life of Iraqis are no better. I don't think they have more democracy than they had under Hussein."

Gabriel Piterberg associate professor of history at UCLA, commenting on the situation in Iraq post-Saddam, March 22, 2004. (link to source)


Juan Cole
"It seems fairly obvious by now that the Bush administration likes being lied to. It is even paying for the privilege of being screwed over. This is sort of reverse crooked. It is to crookedness as sado-masochism is to sex."

Juan Cole, professor of Modern Middle East and South Asian History at the History Department of the University of Michigan, criticizing the Bush Administration's use of intelligence from Iraqi sources for the war in Iraq, March 11, 2004. (link to source)


Juan Cole
"About half of Americans are terminally stupid."

Juan Cole, professor of Modern Middle East and South Asian History at the History Department of the University of Michigan, commenting on the American public's belief that Saddam possessed weapons of mass destruction, February 24, 2004. (link to source)


Yvonne Haddad
"The events of 9/11 brought further restrictions on the Arab/Muslim community. The Bush Administration initiated and the Congress passed HR3162, commonly known as USA PATRIOT (Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism) Act of October 24, 2001. It basically lifted all legal protection of liberty for Muslims and Arabs in the United States."

Georgetown University professor of Islamic studies Yvonne Haddad, in a speech to the Al-Hewar Center on ""George Bush and the Muslims After 9/11: The Search for Moderate Islam," February 18, 2004. (link to source)


Nezar AlSayyad
"We get money from the federal government. That does not mean we do what the federal government says. As academics, we have academic freedom. That's our God-given right."

Nezar AlSayyad, chair of the Center for Middle Eastern Studies at the University of California at Berkeley, speaking against H.R. 3077, legislation establishing an advisory board over area studies programs, February 6, 2004. (link to source)


Fawaz Gerges
"Throughout the Arab world Islamists have concluded violence and terrorism not only hurt their movement but harm the interests of the Muslim community. Since 9/11 some of the most militant Islamists published books condemning Osama bin Laden and Ayman Zawahiri's tactics."

Fawaz Gerges, a professor of Middle East studies at Sarah Lawrence College in New York, commenting on what is happening in the Middle East post 9/11, in an interview in the Christian Science Monitor on February 4, 2004 (link to source)


Juan Cole
"We don't need any more US buildings blown up because our government is coddling cuckoo [Israeli] settlers who are stealing other people's land to fulfill some weird religious power fantasy."

Juan Cole, professor of Modern Middle East and South Asian History at the History Department of the University of Michigan, referring to what the US still has to do in 2004 with regard to the War on Terror, January 2, 2004. (link to source)


Michael Hudson
"... the Syrians also feel they were double-crossed by the US after the Iraq war."

Michael Hudson, Seif Ghobash Professor of Arab Studies and Professor of International Relations, director of the Center for Contemporary Arab Studies at Georgetown University, quoted in the Christian Science Monitor, December 22, 2003. In fact, it was the Syrians who double-crossed the U.S. government, once in 2001 by giving a "direct commitment" to desist from purchasing Iraqi oil and then continuing to so, and again in 2003 by promising to shut down the Hamas and Islamic Jihad offices in Syria, then not doing so. (link to source)


Juan Cole
"What happened Sunday was that the Republicans captured a former ally, with whom they had later fallen out."

Juan Cole, professor of Modern Middle East and South Asian History at the History Department of the University of Michigan, referring to the Dec. 14 announcement of Saddam Hussein's capture, in History News Network, December 15, 2003. (link to source)


Ariel Dorfman
"There has been a closing down of the American mind, and it worries me. If a pro-Palestinian person comes to speak, you have to have a pro-Israeli person. That's not the way to foster debate. The debate does not always occur in television terms, which is you against me. The debate occurs in people's minds, it's ongoing, and what you learn from one person you apply to question the next one."

Ariel Dorfman, a professor of literature and Latin American studies at Duke University, is a member of the academic freedom committee of the international group Human Rights Watch explaining academic freedom on December 12, 2003 (link to source)


Yvonne Yazbeck Haddad
"Intifada is something that Muslims and Palestinians all approve of. It means 'just get off my back'."

Yvonne Yazbeck Haddad, professor of the History of Islam and Christian-Muslim Relations at Georgetown University quoted in the Los Angeles Times on December 7, 2003.


Rashid Khalidi
"The United States is the most phantasmagoric propaganda machine in history."

Rashid Khalidi, Edward Said Professor of Arab Studies and Director of the Middle East Institute at Columbia University, speaking at a conference on "U.S. imperialism in the 21st century" at Columbia University, December 5, 2003.


Miriam Cooke
"'Polygamy can be liberating and empowering,'" Cooke answered sunnily when I asked her about it. 'Our norm is the Western, heterosexual, single couple. If we can imagine different forms that would allow us to be something other than a heterosexual couple, we might imagine polygamy working,' she explained murkily. Some women, she continued, are relieved when their husbands take a new wife: they won't have to service him so often. Or they might find they now have the freedom to take a lover. But, I ask, wouldn't that be dangerous in places where adulteresses can be stoned to death? At any rate, how common is that? 'I don't know,' Cooke answers, 'I'm interested in discourse.'"

Miriam Cooke, professor of Arabic in the Asian and African Languages and Literature Department at Duke University, as quoted by Kay Hymowitz in City Journal (Winter, 2003). (link to source)


Hamid Algar
"America's military presence is metastasizing throughout the Arab world to the point of malignancy. Isn't it curious that Muslims are the ones under pressure to proclaim that their religion is the 'religion of peace'?"

Hamid Algar, professor of Persian and Islamic Studies at Berkeley, commenting on the growing US presence in the Middle East, March 16, 2003. (link to source)


John Voll
"The Saudis have given millions to Harvard Law School, Does that make it a Wahhabi institution?"

John Voll, professor of Islamic History and the Associate Director for the Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding at Georgetown University, making the point that Wahhabism has moderate and extreme strains. (link to source)


Ingrid Mattson
"I have not previously spoken about suicide attacks committed by Muslims in the name of Islam. I did not avoid the subject--it simply did not cross my mind as a priority among the many issues I felt needed to be addressed."

Ingrid Mattson is a professor of Islamic Studies and Christian-Muslim Relations and Director at the Macdonald Center for Islamic Studies at Hartford Seminary in Hartford, CT. Ms. Mattson is addressing remarks made by President Bush in a speech to the nation on Sept 20, 2001 while discussing criticism she received from other Muslims for her public discourse on the role of the Taliban in terrorism, October, 2001. (link to source)


John O. Voll
"Why should we see Salman Rushdie, for example, as a great Islamic moderate and ally, as opposed to looking for those people, and talking with those people, who are strong believers in and upholders of religiously-based moral values, people who believe that religion does have a place in public policy. In this context, the Ayatullah Khumayni, to put it as an extreme case, would have been a better ally for us than Salman Rushdie."

John O. Voll is a professor of Islamic History and the Associate Director for the Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding at Georgetown University, talking to the Philadelphia Society on April 22, 2001 on the topic of "Islam and the End of Secularism." (link to source)


Rashid Khalidi
Rashid Khalidi, then a University of Chicago professor, told USA Today that Bashar Assad represented "a very big change in outlook."

Rashid Khalidi, Edward Said Professor of Arab Studies and Director of the Middle East Institute at Columbia University, commenting on the future of Syria under Bashar Assad following Hafez Assad's death, June 12, 2000.


John L. Esposito
Esposito explained that one man's terrorist is another man's freedom fighter; and that terrorism, as seen in the case of Israel's or the Tel Aviv regime's treatment of Palestinians, can and has been used to legitimate wanton violence and continued acts of oppression. However, surprisingly, Esposito added, "Although I have not read or come across the actual 'fatwa', as a rule, we must not be too quick to draw upon the 'bid`a' gun against anyone, not least of whom the Sheikh al-Azhar."

John L. Esposito, professor of Religion and International Affairs and of Islamic Studies at Georgetown University, responding to the question of whether a fatwa from the Sheikh of Al-Azhar (Cairo) in favor of suicide bombings against Israel was a 'bid`a' [illegitimate legal ruling], September 1997. (link to source)


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